Guest in Focus: Yosuke TAKEUCHI – The Sower

In our ongoing Guest in Focus series, we ask a few questions of several of our visiting filmmakers about their careers, influences, films, and what they think about coming to Germany. Our next guest is the director and writer Yosuke TAKEUCHI, who wrote and directed The Sower.

Yosuke TAKEUCHI, born in 1978, studied at the Shibaura Institute of Technology and then went to Paris to study painting. He won the Jury Special Award at the exhibition of the Académie de Port-Royal in 2003. In 2006, he directed his first short film Segutsu. The Sower is his first feature length film.

(インタビューの日本語版は以下をご覧ください。)

When and how did you first get into filmmaking?

I started making films when I went to The Film School of Tokyo, an evening academy, about ten years ago. I entered that school because I heard that there it was possible to shoot with 16mm film. This way I could shoot my first short film on 16mm.

What were your first film projects? 

That first short film was about a painter from long ago, who was isolated from the world by his parents, didn’t know the outside, and was very lonely.

Where did you get the idea for The Sower, and what story would you like it to tell?

When I was in my early twenties, there was a time when I was painting pictures in Paris. At that time, I was profoundly impressed by a painting by Vincent van Gogh, and since then, I find myself drawn to his life. At that time I didn’t think about making films. However, when I started making films, the letters and paintings he left to the world became more and more important to me, and I wanted my first feature film to be about his life. At that very time, the Great East-Japan Earthquake happened in 2011, and the year after, my niece was born with Down’s syndrome. Issues piled up, and this way The Sower was born.

This film is about individuality and handicap, but it’s not necessarily about the correct answer. However, time and place are greatly influenced by a person’s individuality, that anyone has, and the way society and family accept this individuality. The question is, what can we do, what can we think in such a moment. I believe that these are the questions this film poses.

Were there any funny or difficult situations you experienced during the shooting?

This film was not made through funding or investments of any kind. It’s entirely an independent film. Therefore it was made with a very small budget. So we really had to think about what we could do, and what we needed to focus on. The result was to work with a small crew, and I think that’s the reason why all the staff members could share the big idea and spirit of this film and push through until the very end. Team spirit and communication among staff members is something that is missing from recent Japanese movies, but it’s something that we could realize shooting this film.

Also, the sunflowers in this film were all grown by us. We had decided to grow sunflowers in the disaster area, but it turned out to be extremely difficult to grow sunflowers on the devastated sea shore. The reconstruction of the disaster area is not making much progress, but just as we were wrapping up filming, construction works started in the disaster area where the sunflowers were growing. However thanks to the help of local people, the area with the sunflowers remained. Thanks to that, we succeeded in shooting a wonderful scene.

What do you think about the current situation of Japanese cinema?

Current Japanese cinema is a repetition of making many films, showing them for a short time, and then showing the next. I think it’s obvious that as a result the quality of each single film suffers. The reason for this, I believe, is a downward spiral, with more and more film projects having less and less time and money at their disposal.

It’s being said that Japanese cinema is in decline, but that’s not only because of the filmmakers but in recent years also because of the audience. However, it is Japanese filmmakers are the ones who made the audience this way.

Which three Japanese films from the last decade do you think everybody should see?

Like Someone in Love (2012)
Record Future (2011)
Like Father, Like Son (2013, NC 2014)

Do you have an all-time favorite film, and if yes, is there a particular reason why it’s your favorite?

I can’t decide on only one, but I like the works of great directors from all over the world, and of masters of Japanese film such as Mikio NARUSE and Yasujiro OZU. Recently I like the films by director Michael Haneke very much.

Who is the director/filmmaker that influenced you the most?

Similarly, I’ve been influenced by various directors and films. If I really have to name one, it would be the work of Robert Bresson.

Have you ever been to Germany before, and if so, what was your favorite/strangest/funniest experience?

About ten years ago I went on a solo trip to Europe and also came to Germany. I had no money, so I slept in a tent in parks, but I remember that the cities were very clean and pretty. However, I also have a rather unpleasant memory of plain-clothes police officers asking me for my passport about five times. If I get a chance, I’d like to spend some quiet time in the countryside.

Translated from Japanese.

The Sower will premier on Thursday, 25 May, at 17:15 in Naxoshalle. The film is eligible for the Nippon Visions Jury Award and the Nippon Visions Audience Award.  


インタビューの日本語版

映画作りを始めたのはいつ頃ですか。どのようなきっかけでしたか。

約10年前に映画美学校という夜間の学校に行ったのが映画を始めたきっかけです。
その時は、その学校では16ミリフィルムで撮ることが出来るということで入学しました。
そして初めての短編映画を16ミリフィルムで撮ることが出来ました。

最初の映画プロジェクトはどのようなものでしたか。

その最初の短編は、親に隔離され外の世界を知らない孤独な、せむしの画家の話です。

『種をまく人』のアイディアはどこで得たものですか。また、その映画の中で、監督が表現しようとしているのは、どのようなストーリーですか?

20代前半の時に、私はフランスのパリで絵を描いている時期がありました。その時に出会ったヴィンセント・ヴァン・ゴッホの絵に衝撃を受け、それ以来、彼の人生に惹かれ始めました。その時はまだ映画をやろうとは思っていませんでした。しかし、映画を始めていくうちに彼の残した手紙や絵画が私の中で大きな割合を占めていくようになり、初めての長編映画は彼の人生を描こうとずっと思ってきました。ちょうどそうした時に2011年の東日本大震災が起こり、その翌年にダウン症の姪が産まれました。それらの出来事が重なり「種をまく人」が生まれたのです。
この映画は、個性と障害についての話ですが、必ずしも正解を描いている訳ではありません。しかし、誰しもが持つ個性というものとそれを受け止める社会や家族は大きく時代や場所に左右されます。そういった時に私たちは何が出来て、何を考えることができるのか。そういった問題をこの映画は提起しているのではないかと思います。

撮影中で経験された面白かった出来事や、難しかった出来事は?

この映画は、ファンディングやどこからかの出資によって作られたものではなく、完全な自主映画です。その為、とても少ない予算で作られました。その為、その中で何が出来るのか、何に力を注がなければいけないのか考えざるを得ませんでした。結果、少人数のスタッフでの映画作りでしたが、だからこそこの映画の意図や想いをスタッフ全員が共有し最後まで作りあげる事が出来ました。近年の日本映画に薄れて来てしまった、そういったチームの意思疎通や一体感をこの映画では実現することが出来ました。
そして、この映画に出てくる向日葵は全て自分たちで植えて育てたものです。その中で私たちは被災地に向日葵を植える事を決めたのですが、海沿いの荒れ果てた土地に向日葵を育てることは非常に困難を極めました。未だ被災地の復興は遅々として進んでいないのですが、ちょうど撮影も終盤に差し掛かる頃に、私たちが向日葵を植えた被災地で工事が始まってしまったのです。しかし、地元の有志の方の協力で向日葵を植えた場所は残されることになったのです。
その結果素晴らしいシーンを撮ることに成功しました。

日本映画の現状についてどう思われますか。

現在の日本映画は多く作って、短期間上映してまた次を上映するという繰り返しです。
その結果、一つ一つの映画の質が落ちるのは当たり前のことだと思います。時間も予算もかけられない映画の現場が増えてしまったことに現在の日本映画の悪循環が続いてしまっている原因ではないかと思います。
日本映画は衰退の一途をたどっていると言われていますが、それは作る側に限らず、観る側の近年の傾向にもあると思います。しかし、そういった観客を作ってきたのは今までの日本映画の制作者側にあるのです。

ここ10年の日本映画のなかで、必ずみてほしい三本は?

『ライク・サムワン・イン・ラブ』 Like Someone in Love (2012年)
『未来の記録』 Record Future (2011年)
『そして父になる』 Like Father, Like Son (2013年)

一番好きな映画がありましたら教えてください。また、その理由はなんですか。

一番は決められませんが、成瀬巳喜男や小津安二郎はじめかつての日本映画の作品や世界中の素晴らしい監督たちの映画は好きです。最近ですと、ミヒャエル・ハネケ監督の映画はとても好きです。

これまで一番影響を受けられた監督・映画人は誰ですか。

これも同じように様々な映画監督の作品に影響を受けてきました。あえてあげるとすれば、ロベール・ブレッソンの映画です。

ドイツに来られたことはありますか?もしありましたら、一番好きな・変な・面白い経験はなんでしたか。

約10年前にヨーロッパを一人旅している時に、ドイツに行きました。お金もなかったので公園にテントを張って寝ていましたが、街はとても整備されていて美しかった思い出があります。
しかし、5回くらい私服警官にパスポートの提示を求められた苦い思い出もあります。
今度機会があれば田舎の町で、ゆっくり過ごしてみたいです。

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s